8. Finding Sherbrooke’s Sons in WW1

Project Site : Finding Sherbrooke & Bulli Mountain’s Sons in WW1 – Under Construction

Can you help us – we’re looking for the descendants of Sherbrooke and Bulli Mountain’s families who served in WW 1 – so far it seems that most served on the Western Front in  France and / or Belgium, several in Gallipoli, one in Palestine, one in India, but none so far in the  AN & MEF who left for Bitapaka in German New Guinea in August 1914.

Our research was inspired by the older brother of Robert Trevis Clifford Jones – Bert who enlisted as an 18 year old and served in the 4th Field Ambulance. Bert’s family had put together a wonderful collection of information. This is available to peruse in one of the Sherbrooke Folders in the Black Diamond Heritage Centre Museum in the State Heritage listed 1887 Bulli Railway Station East building.

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Some of Sherbrooke’s sons tried to enlist but were declared medically unfit, including a Haberley descendant who marched on the South Coast Waratah Recruitment March, and not all could be described as “angels”. We did not find any nurses either – though the Parsons family descendants did have a cousin, Emily Mary Rebecca Parsons who served as  a Nurse in WW1.

And we have found that at least seven descendants died – one in Gallipoli and three on the Western Front, brothers John Burnett and Donald McDonald Fletcher, and another two brothers William Herbert and Preston Henry Hunt, as well as their Hunt cousin, Francis Joseph Hunt. The Fletcher’s were notable for having six of the eight brothers enlist in WW1. Albert Henry Loveday died of pneumonia and was buried at sea – and is commemorated in Egypt. His brother Ross Loveday died of meningitis in England.

If you know of anymore descendants in WW1 that we may have missed, please let us know.

By the way – there are host of WW1 related sites,  but some we use and recommend include the following sites :

And don’t forget your local family history group and their resources eg the Illawarra Family History Group has books such Pre 1900 Illawarra Families and pre 1020 Illawarra Families which are also used in the research for this web site.

Below are names we’ve confirmed as Sherbrooke and Bulli Mountain descendants in WW1 – as well as other potential names which we’re still checking.

Note – some were born in the Northern Illawarra, but obviously with the destruction of Sherbrooke for Cataract Dam, some of the families spread more widely across the Illawarra and NSW.

Bishop

  • Louis Victor Bishop – son of Charles Bishop and wife Louisa Jane Organ – enlisted in 1916 and served in the 3rd and 4th Battalions, as well as the Imperial Camel Corps in the Middle East. He embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A42 Boorara on 10 May 1917, was wounded   and returned to Australia 12 July 1918
  • Gilbert Stanley Swaine – son of Eliza Jane Swaine nee Bishop and husband  John James Swaine – enlisted in 1916 –  attached to the 20th Battalion briefly but was discharged as medically unfit for active service due to Chronic Otitis Media in the Left Ear which was attributed to Measles.

Braisher 

  • George Fishlock – son of Mary Ann Fishlock nee Braisher and Michael Fishlock – enlisted in August 1914 – served in the 3rd Battalion – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 19 October 1914 – served in Gallipoli – awarded Meritorious Service Medal – ADFA entry
  • Lomas Fishlock – son of Mary Ann Fishlock nee Braisher and Michael Fishlock – enlisted in August 1914 – served in the 3rd Battalion – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 19 October 1914 – served in Gallipoli – ADFA entry. For a time Lomas Fishlock was reported missing, however his family were fortunate in that he returned home to them.
  • Albert Edward Bunker – son of Charlotte Bunker nee Braisher and John Bunker – enlisted in February 1915 – served in the 17th Battalion – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A32 Themistocles on 12 May 1915 – served in Gallipoli and on the Western Front – ADFA entry – returned to Australia December 1918
  • Albert Henry Loveday – son of Lewis Loveday and wife Louisa Brazier – and grandson of Sherbrooke “Patriarch” John Loveday, brother of Ross Loveday. Enlisted in February 1915, served in the 25th Battalion, embarked from Brisbane, Queensland, on board HMAT A60 Aeneas on 29 June 1915. He died at sea of pneumonia in July 1915 – buried at sea. Remembered at the Chatby Memorial in Alexandria Egypt and on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Panel 105 in Canberra.
  • Ross Loveday – son of Lewis Loveday and wife Louisa Brazier – and grandson of Sherbrooke “Patriarch” John Loveday, brother of Albert Henry Loveday. Enlisted in October 1916, served in the 15th Battalion – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A72 Beltana on 25 November 1916 – died of meningitis in Birmingham, England, 1917 – buried Efford Cemetery (Portion General, Row C, Grave No. 4221), Devonshire – commemorated at the Australian War Memorial Panel 76.

Brown (Sherbrooke)

  • Charles Wilfred Musgrave  (1887 – 1984) – son of Elizabeth Brown and her husband Thomas Musgrave  was a bank manager with E S and A Bank and had enlisted in WW1 in September 1918 and was accepted
  • Ambrose Oliver Brown – son of Frederick JJ Brown & wife Lydia (nee Knight) – enlisted in 1916 and served with the 49th Battalion in France, after embarking at Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A64 Demosthenes on 23 December 1916 served in France in October 1917 through to May 1918, when he was suffering illness until returning to his unit in September 1918. From the Australian War Memorial site : “Later in the year, the focus of the AIF’s operations moved to the Ypres sector in Belgium. There the battalion fought in the battle of Messines on 9 June and the battle of Polygon Wood on 26 September. Another winter of trench routine followed. Another winter of trench routine followed. With the collapse of Russia in October 1917, a major German offensive on the Western Front was expected in early 1918. This occurred in France in late March and the 4th Division moved to defend positions around the Dernancourt on the River Ancre. The 49th Battalion assisted in the repulse of a large German attack on 5 April, launching a critical counter-attack late in the afternoon. The German threat remained until late April, and in the early hours of ANZAC Day 1918 the 49th participated in the now legendary attack to dislodge the enemy from Villers-Bretonneux.”
  • Eric Roy Brown – son of Frederick JJ Brown and wife Lydia (nee Knight) – like brother Ambrose Oliver Brown he became part of the 49th Battalion – enlisted in 1916 – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A64 Demosthenes on 23 December 1916 –  served in France in October 1917  to about March 1918 when he rejoined his Battalion, remaining there until September 1918 until more health issues occurred – returning to the Battalion in October 1918 Returned to Australia 22 August 1919
  • Wilfred Aubrey Brown – son of William George Brown – enlisted in August 1918 having previously served with the 28th Light Horse Regiment in the CMF – he was discharged in late October 1918 and so was not deployed overseas. However in 1953 he was installed as a Legatee with Legacy – Trove.He also served in WW2
  • Montague Ambrose Brown – son of James Ambrose Brown  – AWM entry “born near Bega, NSW in 1899 and was educated at St Joseph’s College, Hunters Hill. On leaving school he returned to the New South Wales south coast where he was active in the pre-war Australian Army militia, serving with 1 Light Horse as a trooper from 31 December 1909. On 1 April 1910 he was promoted to corporal and three months later to sergeant. In July 1912 he transferred to 28 Light Horse where he promoted to regimental sergeant major on 1 January 1913. Brown was offered a commission to 2nd lieutenant on 1 August 1913. With the declaration of war in 1914 he was an early volunteer in the AIF. However, upon joining he reverted to the rank of trooper.  In 1917 he was transferred to the Indian Army for a five year engagement with the Imperial Government. During his time in India he served as a captain with 9 Hodson’s Horse Cavalry Regiment and saw active service during the third Anglo-Afghan war between May and August 1919. On 8 November 1922 Brown’s period of service with the Indian Army ended and he returned to Australia. During the 1930s he lived in western NSW, and also spent time in the Hunter Valley. Brown served as a major with 16 Light Horse between December 1926 and August 1935. While with this regiment he was a Commanding Officer of 16 ‘Hunter River Lancers’ Light Horse Regiment, with its Headquarters in East Maitland. After service with this unit he transferred to the 16 Machine Gun Battalion. Considered too old for active service upon the declaration of the Second World War in September 1939,his first posting saw him first serve at the Prisoner of War and internment camp at Berrima in the Southern Highlands of NSW. After this posting he became the Group Commandant of the 22nd Garrison Battalion at the newly built Prisoner of War Camp No.12 at Cowra NSW. During his time at Cowra, the infamous ‘Cowra breakout’ occurred on the night of 5 August 1944. Brown left the military in 1947 and passed away in 1975.” He had been a Second Lieutenant with the Royal NSW Lancers in 1913 – 28th Lighthorse – enlisted in January 1915 – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A29 Suevic on 13 June 1915 – served with the 1st Lighthorse in Gallipoli in August 1915 ,  – became part of the Western Force in Egypt in January 1916, 12th Lighthorse Regiment  in February 1916, 4th Lighthorse in March 1917, before returning to the 12th Lighthorse in April 1917, and in August 1917 was part of the 4th Brigade Headquarters and as 2nd Lieutenant then Captain Discharged 18 October 1917 when  appointed to a permanent commission in the Horse Cavalry Regiment of the Indian Army – Image 1, Image 2, Image 3, Image 4

Charlesworth – Sheather (Bulli Mountain)

  • Percival George Henry Sheather – enlisted in November 1915 served in the 18th Battalion in France and Belgium (son of Lucy Forde-Sheather nee Charlesworth). He embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A71 Nestor on 9 April 1916. He was wounded in France in September 1917,  was returned to the field to Belgium in January 1918 and in April 1918, and so was invalided back to Australia in July 1918.
  • James Joseph Sheather – (son of Lucy Forde-Sheather nee Charlesworth) enlisted in November 1915 and served in the 4th Battalion – embarking from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A62 Wandilla on 3 February 1916. He started in France, sustaining gun shot wounds in November 1916 – and his family was advised that he was dangerously ill. He also suffered Measles in January 1917, before he was invalided to Australia departing in April 1917, arriving in Sydney in June 1917, and discharged medically unfit in July 1917.
  • Note two of their Sheather branch cousins, sons of former Bulli girl Catherine Ross-Sheather  nee McKenzie were killed in WW1.
    • Archibald Hugh “Artie” Sheather (b. December 29 1882 Palmers Island – d. August 12 1918 France). Killed in Action – buried Heath Cemetery Harbonnieres, France, plot 11 row H grave 17
    • Edward John “Ted” Sheather (b. September 26 1884 in Palmers Island – d. October 20 1918 France). Recorded as Missing or Wounded in Action – Killed in Action – Dying of Broncho-Pneumonia in the 41st Stationary Hospital Somme – buried October 21 1918 Villiers Bretonneux Military Cemetery Fouilloy France plot xvii row AA grave 9)

Fletcher (Sherbrooke)- six of eight brothers William, John, Arthur, Edgar, Donald and Abram all served – John and Donald were killed on the Western Front

Jessie Fletcher & her sons - courtesy of Mick Roberts, Looking Back

Jessie Fletcher & her sons – courtesy of Mick Roberts, Looking Back

  • William Joseph Fletcher – son of Jessie Elizabeth and Abraham Fletcher – enlisted in WW1 in New Zealand in 1917 – was working as a miner with the Bruce Railway Coal Company and living at Milton Otago area, married with three children. He embarked on “Tahiti” from Wellington in November 1917 with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, arriving in Liverpool UK in January 1918, then proceeded to France. William was in Rouen France in May 1918 and  joined 1/ENT Battalion  in May 1918; transferred to 1/Battalion Auckland R. He sustained with multiple gun shot wounds in France in 1918 – sent to Boulogne and then evacuated to England in late August 1918 for medical treatment. Returned on the Briton  in January 1919.

 1918 Obituary. FLETCHER. — In loving memory of Pte. John Burnett Fletcher killed in action at Mouquet Farm, August 29. 1916, dearly loved husband of Annie Fletcher, and father of Winnie and Jack.

He has borne his cross,

He has gained his crown;

Though he sleeps in a far-off land,

We think of his life

A duty done.

Manly, unselfish and brave —

A soldier and a man. ; 

Inserted by his loving wife and little children.

1921 Obituary FLETCHER. —

In loving memory of my dear husband and our daddy, Private John Burnett Fletcher, killed in action August 29th, 1916 (missing), at Pozieres.

Only a memory of bygone days,

And a wish for a face unseen,

But a constant feeling that -God alone ‘

Knowest best what might have been.

Inserted by his loving wife and children.

1927  Obituary FLETCHER

In loving memory of my dear husband and our father, Pte. . John Burnett Fletcher, killed in action at Pozieres, August 29th, 1916.

Loved in life

Remembered still in death

Inserted by his loving wife and children, Jack, and Winnie.

  • Arthur Hall  Fletcher   – Wharf Labourer / Driver – son of Jessie Elizabeth and Abraham Fletcher – enlisted in New Zealand to serve in WW1 married Kate Edith Mettham – living in New Zealand at Corbett St Paeroa – served in B Company.C1  LWP in August 1918. Unclear if he served overseas.
  • Edgar Norman Ted Fletcher – son of Jessie Elizabeth and Abraham Fletcher – enlisted in March 1915 and embarked in 25 June 1915 on the HMAT A35 Berrima, serving in the 20th Battalion. He was at Gallipoli and in Pozieres France and was hospitalised at both locations, before being repatriated to Australia in 1917, where he was discharged in June 1917.
    • From the Australian War Memorial on the 20th Battalion – “trained in Egypt from late July until mid-August, and on 22 August landed at ANZAC Cove. Arriving at Gallipoli just as the August offensive petered out, the 20th’s role there was purely defensive. From 26 August, until its withdrawal from the peninsula on 20 December, the 20th Battalion was responsible for the defence of Russell’s Top. After further training in Egypt, the 20th Battalion proceeded to France. It entered the trenches of the Western Front for the first time in April 1916 and in the following month had the dubious honour of being the first Australian battalion to be raided by the Germans. The 20th took part in its first major offensive around Pozieres between late July and the end of August 1916. After a spell in a quieter sector of the front in Belgium, the 2nd Division, which included the5th Brigade, came south again in October. The 20th Battalion provided reinforcements for the attack near Flers between 14 and 16 November, launched in conditions that Charles Bean described as the worst ever encountered by the AIF.”
    • http://wollongong-nsw.honouringanzacs.net.au/view-anzac-searched.php?aid=278191&anzactype=1&search_text=Wollongong,%20NSW,%20Australia
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  • Donald McDonald Fletcher – son of Jessie Elizabeth and Abraham Fletcher  – brother of Harriet Blinkco – enlisted in February 1915 – anticipating departure in 1915 (also) – embarked on  board Transport A40 Ceramic on 25 June 1915 and served in the 18th Battalion –  killed at Polygon Wood September 20, 1917 and was initially reported missing in 1917, and declared killed in 1918. His 18th Battalion had trained in Egypt from mid-June until mid-August, and on 22 August 1915 landed at ANZAC Cove.
    The battalion had not been ashore a day when it was committed to the last operation of the August Offensive ‘ the attack on Hill 60 ‘ which lasted until 29 August and cost it 50 per cent casualties.” Donald was wounded on the landing day of August 22, 1915 and evacuated to Mudros and then invalided to England. He was Repatriated to Australia in October 1915 and then returned on board HMAT A18 Wiltshire on 7 February 1917. The 18th “battalion took part in three major battles before the year was out: the second Bullecourt (3-4 May) in France; and Menin Road (20-22 September).” Donald was Killed in Action 20 September 1917 – presumably as part of the Menin Road action. He is buried at Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery Extension (Plot I, Row L, Grave No. 7), Boesinghe, Ypres Belgium – which has also been known as St. Jean-les-Ypres – note he was originally buried at Westhoek, Belgium. Refer FindaGrave entry – Commonwealth War Graves Commission entry – Australian War Graves Photographic Project entry. He is commemorated on Panel 85 at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

1918 Memoriam FLETCHER.-In loving memoir of Private Donald
McDonald Fletcher, aged 21 years, killed in action, Polygon Wood, September 20, 1917; also his beloved cousin, Private Donald M’Donald, aged 23 years, killed September 20, 1917.

We pictured their safe returning,

And longed to clasp their hands;

But God has postponed the meeting,

‘Twill lie in a better land,”

Inserted by their fond parents, Mrs. Fletcher, Newtown, and Mrs. McDonald and family, 61 Alma -street, Darlington.

1922 Memoriam  FLETCHER. — In loving memory of , my dear sons and brothers, Private Donald McDonald Fletcher, who was killed in action at Polygon Wood (France), September 20); 1917, 18th Battalion. Also his brother. J. B. Fletcher, Who was killed in- action at Pozieres (France), August 29, 1916, 13th Battalion.

‘ A beautiful .memory left behind ?
Of my loving sons so good an-l kind.
We have lost, but heaven has gained,
The best the world contained.

Inserted by their sorrowing mother, sisters, and brothers,  Mrs. L E.Fletcher, ‘Lady Wood,’ Heath.st..Auburn.

  • Abram Fletcher – son of Jessie Elizabeth and Abraham Fletcher – enlisted in October 1915, embarked on board HMAT A68 Anchises on 14 March 1916 and served in the 31st Battalion – returned to Australia 22 December 1918. “The 31st Battalion fought its first major battle at Fromelles on 19 July 1916, having only entered the front-line trenches 3 days previously. The attack was a disastrous introduction to battle for the 31st – it suffered 572 casualties, over half of its strength. Although it still spent periods in the front line, the 31st played no major offensive role for the rest of the year.” It appears that Abram was ill in late June 1916, and so was not with the 31st Battalion at the time of the July 1916 Fromelles disaster. He appears to have returned to France in December 1916, and was wounded in action in France in late February 1917, and was evacuated to England. He returned to France in May 1918, and by August 1918 he appeared to be suffering from Influenza which continued for some months, and on November 9 1918 he was evacuated to England. By December 1918 he was being invalided to Australia on the HT Bakara. IMG_20140823_150342

Haberley (Sherbrooke)

  • Charles Haberley (record yet to be transcribed by National Archives of Australia)

Hicks (Bulli Mountain)

  • Family Listing : Descendants of James Hicks – including George Hicks / Henry Thomas Hicks Jnr / Harold Milton Fredericks  / William J Hicks / Richard John Hicks / William John Hicks / William Arthur Woodford / Charles Henry McEwen / William Spowart / William T Collings / Lyell Hicks / Hamilton Leslie Hicks / Harry Blundell – many injured but none killed

Hunt –  note the Hunt’s are descendants of William Brown and Elizabeth Catherine Foss via their daughter Mary Ann  and thus are cousins to the Brown’s of Sherbrooke. Six Hunt cousins & brothers served in WW1 – three of whom died.

  • Charles Henry Hunt – son of William Hunt and wife Ruth Caroline Galloway – ADFA listing – enlisted in March 1915, embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board Transport A40 Ceramic on 25 June 1915,  and served in the 18th Battalion, wounded – returned to Australia in 1916 or 1917
  • Thomas James Hunt – son of Ellen and George Charles Hunt – Thomas enlisted in April 1915  when he was living at Kingston on School Hill Thirroul according to his service record and served in the 4th Battalion He embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A63 Karoola on 16 June 1915 – suffered pneumonia and was returned to Australia in 1916, medically discharged due to being unfit arising from debilitating effects of the pneumonia. Thomas then re-enlisted in May 1918, possibly part of the 53rd Battalion but due to ill health he was not deployed overseas.
  • Francis Joseph Hunt, Labourer, – son of Ellen and George Charles Hunt – 45th Battalion, but mainly served on the Western Front in the 56th Battalion. He enlisted in March 1917 . He embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A74 Marathon on 10 May 1917, and was deployed to the field in late 1917.  Serving in France, he was gassed on June 1918, admitted to hospital in Rouen, and subsequently died of gas poisoning 10 days later on 12 June 1918 . Francis was buried at St. Sever Cemetery Extension (Block Q, Plot III, Row G, Grave No. 18), Rouen, France. Commonwealth War Grave entry – FindaGrave entry – Australian War Graves Photographic Project entry. At the Australian War Memorial, he is commemorated on the Roll of Honour, and his name can be found on Panel 162.
  •  William Henry Bill Hunt – son of Ellen and George Hunt – enlisted in November 1914, served in the 13th Battalion – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A48 Seang Bee on 11 February 1915. Returned to Australia 1917.
  • William Henry Hunt.

    William Henry Hunt.

  • Prescott Henry Hunt, Labourer  – son of Negus and Rose Hunt – enlisting in December 1916 and served in 45th Battalion. He embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A68 Anchises on 24 January 1917, and proceeded to France in June 1917. He sustained  multiple gun shot wounds on June 6 1918, and died of these wounds on 19 June 1918 and was buried at Crouy British Cemetery (Plot II, row D, Grave No. 17), Crouy-Sur-Somme, France, 10 miles North West of Amiens. He is commemorated on Panel 139 of the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.
  • William Herbert “Bert” Hunt – son of Negus and Rose Hunt – enlisted in September 1914 2nd Battalion. He embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board Transport A23 Suffolk on 18 October 1914, and subsequently embarked Alexandria to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, Gallipoli, 5 April 1915. William was wounded in action, Gallipoli, 7 May 1915; and died of wounds, Hospital Ship ‘Lutzow’, 8 May 1915, and was buried at sea.

Official news announcement in June 1915, locally in the South Coast Times“Bert Hunt.killed at the Dardanelles, was a native of Helensburgh, where his mother (Mrs. R. Mangles), still resides. His father, the late Negus Hunt, was accidentally killed in the Metropolitan mine some few years ago.”

He is commemorated on Panel 33 at the Australian War Memorial, in Canberra and on Panel 17 at Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli Turkey.“The Lone Pine Memorial, situated in the Lone Pine Cemetery at Anzac, is the main Australian Memorial on Gallipoli, and one of four memorials to men of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Designed by Sir John Burnet, the principal architect of the Gallipoli cemeteries, it is a thick tapering pylon 14.3 metres high on a square base 12.98 metres wide. It is constructed from limestone mined at Ilgardere in Turkey. The Memorial commemorates the 3268 Australians and 456 New Zealanders who have no known grave and the 960 Australians and 252 New Zealanders who were buried at sea after evacuation through wounds or disease. The names of New Zealanders commemorated are inscribed on stone panels mounted on the south and north sides of the pylon, while those of the Australians are listed on a long wall of panels in front of the pylon and to either side. Names are arranged by unit and rank. The Memorial stands over the centre of the Turkish trenches and tunnels which were the scene of heavy fighting during the August offensive.”

Jones (Sherbrooke)

  • Alfred Ernest Bertrand Jone (Spinks) – ADFA entry – 18 year old chauffeur and son of Elizabeth Jones nee Spinks. He enlisted in November 1915 and embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A61 Kanowna on 29 March 1916. Bert served in France with the 4th Field Ambulance from August 1916, as part of the Army Medical Corps. He returned to Australia in August 1917. A significant amount of material has been provided to the Sherbrooke project by Bert’s family, and can be found in the Sherbrooke binder in the Black Diamond Heritage Centre Museum. It is very interesting reading for its glimpses of the role of the Field Ambulance units on the Western Front in WW1.  Scroll down to see also his WW1 reference under Spinks section of this page.

Kimbrey (Sherbrooke)

Knight (Sherbrooke)

  • Cecil Charles Knight – Farmer of Lismore – son of David K Knight – enlisted in October 1915 served in the 5th Lighthorse and 2nd Field Artillery  in France – ADFA entry. He embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A47 Mashobra on 5 April 1916. Returned to Australia in 1919.
  • Oliver Herbert Knight – possibly son of John and Ellen Knight – enlisted 1915 – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board Transport A40 Ceramic on 25 June 1915 – served in the 18th Battalion returned to Australia 1919  – wounded in 1918 
  • Harold Edgar Booth – son of Rose Booth nee Knight and Harry Booth – enlisted in 1915  and was discharged in 1916 enlisted in 1917 but not deployed overseas until mid 1918 and became part of the reinforcements to the 35th Battalion – spending time in Fovant Military Hospital  before returning to Australia in early 1919. Uncertain whether he was in action with the 35th Battalion on the Western Front at Amiens in August 1918 and the Hindenburg Line action of September 1918. (Note – it would appear that he may have also sought to enlist in WW2 ?)
  • Eric Roy Brown – son of Frederick JJ Brown and wife Lydia (nee Knight) – like brother Ambrose Oliver Brown he became part of the 49th Battalion – enlisted in 1916 – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A64 Demosthenes on 23 December 1916 –  served in France in October 1917  to about March 1918 when he rejoined his Battalion, remaining there until September 1918 until more health issues occurred – returning to the Battalion in October 1918 Returned to Australia 22 August 1919
  • Ambrose Oliver Brown – son of Frederick JJ Brown & wife Lydia (nee Knight) – enlisted in 1916 and served with the 49th Battalion in France, after embarking at Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A64 Demosthenes on 23 December 1916 served in France in October 1917 through to May 1918, when he was suffering illness until returning to his unit in September 1918. From the Australian War Memorial site : “Later in the year, the focus of the AIF’s operations moved to the Ypres sector in Belgium. There the battalion fought in the battle of Messines on 9 June and the battle of Polygon Wood on 26 September. Another winter of trench routine followed. Another winter of trench routine followed. With the collapse of Russia in October 1917, a major German offensive on the Western Front was expected in early 1918. This occurred in France in late March and the 4th Division moved to defend positions around the Dernancourt on the River Ancre. The 49th Battalion assisted in the repulse of a large German attack on 5 April, launching a critical counter-attack late in the afternoon. The German threat remained until late April, and in the early hours of ANZAC Day 1918 the 49th participated in the now legendary attack to dislodge the enemy from Villers-Bretonneux.”

Loveday

  • Albert Henry Loveday – son of Lewis Loveday and wife Louisa Brazier – and grandson of Sherbrooke “Patriarch” John Loveday, brother of Ross Loveday. Enlisted in February 1915, served in the 25th Battalion, embarked from Brisbane, Queensland, on board HMAT A60 Aeneas on 29 June 1915. He died at sea of pneumonia in July 1915 – buried at sea. Remembered at the Chatby Memorial in Alexandria Egypt and on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Panel 105 in Canberra.
  • Ross Loveday – son of Lewis Loveday and wife Louisa Brazier – and grandson of Sherbrooke “Patriarch” John Loveday, brother of Albert Henry Loveday. Enlisted in October 1916, served in the 15th Battalion – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A72 Beltana on 25 November 1916 – died of meningitis in Birmingham, England, 1917 – buried Efford Cemetery (Portion General, Row C, Grave No. 4221), Devonshire – commemorated at the Australian War Memorial Panel 76.

Parsons

So far no Sherbrooke Parsons nor a direct descendant have been identified as serving in WW1 – however their cousin Emily Rebecca Mary Parsons served as  a nurse, whilst other cousins Alfred Nathan Shipp and Mathew Tubman were both  killed in WW1.

Smithers 

  • Sydney Stanley Smithers – son of Albert Smithers and wife Emily Loveday – enlisted in WW1 with New Zealand Expeditionary Forces in 1915 and served with the Wellington Mounted Rifles – wounded twice at Gallipoli and then served in the Middle East.

Spinks

  • Alfred Ernest Bertrand Jone (Spinks) – 18 year old chauffeur and son of Elizabeth Jones nee Spinks. He enlisted in November 1915 and embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A61 Kanowna on 29 March 1916. Bert served in France with the 4th Field Ambulance from August 1916, as part of the Army Medical Corps. He returned to Australia in August 1917. A significant amount of material has been provided to the Sherbrooke project by Bert’s family, and can be found in the Sherbrooke binder in the Black Diamond Heritage Centre Museum. It is very interesting reading for its glimpses of the role of the Field Ambulance units on the Western Front in WW1.
  • Edward Spinks Miner – ADFA entry – son of William John Spinks and Lucy Mary Nichols enlisted in August 1918 – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board SS Wyreema on 14 October 1918; troopship was recalled and they were disembarked in December 1918 – discharged in January 1919.
  • Cecil Spinks – Wheeler – ADFA entry – son of John and Lena Spinks of Bellambi – enlisted in 1915 – served in the 2nd Battalion – embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A8 Argyllshire on 30 September 1915 – listed with the 57th Battalion – struggled with army discipline – rebellious, court martial
  • John Charles Spinks b. 1873 – of Chester St Bellambi – dropped his age by 3 years to try to enlist in WW1 in September 1918, but was rejected as medically unfit.
  • Note their Spinks cousin, Frederick Keith James Spinks also served in WW1, in the 20th Battalion, was killed at Pozieres 26 July 1916, with no known grave, and is commemorated at Villers Brettoneux, France, as well as at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra on Panel 92.
  • Edward Bradley – son of Edward Bradley and his wife Isabella Chilby, (daughter of Thomas Chilby and Agnes Spinks) b.1894 Thirroul – Killed in Action 3.7.1916 at Fleurbaix near Fromelles, France. The second of the 64 Illawarra men to die in July 1916 in WW1. He is commemorated at Illawarra Remembers 1914 – 1918 and Rue Petillon Military Cemetery, France. CWGC Entry. AWM Roll of Honour entry. Discovering ANZACS Service Record  Service Number 9882- a Gunner with the 1st Australian Divisional Ammunition Column – ADFA WW1 entry.
  • Thomas Bradley – son of Edward Bradley and his wife Isabella Chilby, (daughter of Thomas Chilby and Agnes Spinks) – Discovering ANZAC’s Service Record – ADFA WW1 entry. “Thomas served in Egypt before being returned to Australia because of ill health. He was admitted to hospital at Heliopolis for cronic dysentary on 5th March, 1916. Placed on Garrison duty on 20th March, 1916 Thomas was re-admitted to hospital on 23rd March and returned home in May 1916. He was discharged medically unfit on 31st July, 1916” – from Illawarra Remembers 1914 – 1918 
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